Problem Solving

Building a Problem Solving Organization Presentation

by Jamie Flinchbaugh on 05-15-12

I want to thank Enterprise Minnesota and the Center for Business & Industry for hosting me during the Lean Enterprise Summit held today. The following are my slides from my talk on building a problem solving organization.  

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eBook published on A3 Problem Solving

by Jamie Flinchbaugh on 02-14-12

We are still very proud of our book, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Lean, that has done very well over the past few years. The book publishing world is changing, very rapidly. I’ve had one of the big publishers ask me about doing another book. I’m not ready for that yet.

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Kodak and Fuji: a tale of two companies in the face of the same insurmountable problem

by Jamie Flinchbaugh on 02-08-12

The Economist had an excellent article detailing the difference between Kodak’s historic bankruptcy and Fujifilm’s equally remarkable success, in The last Kodak moment?, and expanded on in Sharper focus. Both companies faced the same problem statement: digital photography would replace film. But Eastman Kodak, founded in 1880, despite it’s major

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The failure of "Don’t bring me problems, bring me solutions!"

by Jamie Flinchbaugh on 02-07-12

I head this approach many times, and in many different forms. Managers say “I don’t want people to bring me problems; I want them to bring me solutions.” Or “I don’t want more questions, I want answers.” I ran across this on the Harvard Business Review Blog in The No

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Why won’t they tell me there is a problem?

by Jamie Flinchbaugh on 01-24-12

Leaders ask people to tell them what problems they have. This isn’t a practice exclusive to lean. MBWA, or Management By Walking Around, even incorporated this concept. In some organizations, there are systems in place (whether digital or on a board) for individuals to capture and surface problems. We ask

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Northeast Shingo Prize Keynote Presentation on Problem Solving

by Jamie Flinchbaugh on 10-06-11

The Northeast Shingo Prize recognizes business excellence regionally. They are established with the goal of making manufacturing facilities and other industries more competitive in the global marketplace, illustrating how world-class results can be achieved through the implementation of lean principles and techniques in core manufacturing and other business processes. This

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Call firefighting and band-aids what they are – but do them in a structured way

by Jamie Flinchbaugh on 09-19-11

  Sometimes, firefighting is the right answer. Once the fire is burning, whether figuratively or literally, you must put it out. There’s nothing wrong with this. But that doesn’t mean you can’t be a reactive, firefighting organization in a structured way. What would you structure in this reactive mode? First,

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Why do we still use RE-training as a "solution" to problems so frequently?

by Jamie Flinchbaugh on 08-17-11

Through my coaching efforts with clients, I get to see a lot of problems and a lot of solutions. I’ve never tried to take the solutions as data and categorize them. If I did, I think the most common solution people try is… retraining. Not training, RE-training. As in AGAIN.

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Leaning-out “dead wood” in a subcontractor-based business [Guest Post]

by Kurt Woolley on 05-23-11

Guest Post: Kurt Woolley is Lean Champion within Intel’s Fab/Sort Manufacturing (FSM) organization, and founder of Atmos Industries. See more on his LinkedIn profile at http://www.linkedin.com/pub/kurt-woolley/3/941/575. Do lean methods apply within a subcontractor-based business? Oh yes! In my recent journeys, I’ve had the opportunity to work with a sub-contractor business –

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10 Management Traps – and How to Avoid Them

by Jamie Flinchbaugh on 04-30-11

Recently Steve Minter of Industry Week interviewed a range of people for an article he titled 10 Management Traps – and How to Avoid Them. The ten traps he lists are: 1. Not ‘Nipping it in the Bud’ 2. Squelching the Flow of Bad News 3. Doing Drop-Down Work 4.

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